Pulled pork eggs Benedict

Eggs Benedict Variations

As we’ve written before, Eggs Benedict is perhaps the perfect brunch dish and our Original Eggs Benedict is one of the most satisfying things I know to eat. I find the standard version nice but a little bit boring. The English muffin and straight ham just lacks character to really pop. But, with the overall framework of the dish as good as it is this opens up for further experimentation.

The result is, of course, that we’ve experimented with different variations of Eggs Benedict, keeping to the formula of meat, a carbohydrate vessel, a poached egg and Hollandaise sauce. For this round-up we have five versions, but a I can already think of many more things to try. The five recipes we have are:

  • Classic Eggs Benedict
  • Mashed Potato Eggs Benedict
  • Pulled Pork with Smoked Chili Hollandaise Sauce Eggs Benedict
  • Smoked Chuck-eye and Hash Browns Eggs Benedict
  • Scones Benedict

The Mashed Potato Eggs Benedict and Chuck-eye Benedicts are inspired by Restaurant Marc Forgione’s Eggs Benny and the Signature Short Rib Benedict at The Henry at the Cosmopolitan, Las Vegas, respectively. Meat and potatoes are a match made in heaven and these showed me that they can add something to Eggs Benedict as well. I really enjoy Forgione’s style of making “dirty” bistro style food with a hidden, high level execution. It feels alive and unpretentious while being multidimensional and satisfying on a really deep level. It’s the sort of food that develops a craving.

I’ve chosen to do an “indoor apartment smoke” of chuck-eye instead of braised short ribs for my beefs Benedict. You could use brisket or short ribs as well, but where I live chuck is much easier to find in the stores. The same technique is used for the pulled pork and yields super soft meat with lots of character, to keep the overall feel of the dish while bringing up the fireworks. For the pulled pork, we’re using a cut-out of wheat bread to hint at a classic pulled pork sandwich.

Finally, for the ones you can always go to even if you failed in planning, the Scones Benedict are something you can do with the things you usually have at home. The scones also provides a bit more rustic style which works very well with the bacon.

Poached Eggs

2 servings (10 minutes)

  • 4 eggs
  • 5 ml white wine vinegar
  1. Bring a pan of water to barely a simmer. Use a large pan, but only fill it with water to about 20 cm height and add a splash of white wine vinegar.
  2. Cook the eggs whole in their shells for 30 seconds, immediately followed by putting them under cold water or in an ice bath. Keep the water in the sauce pan simmering.
  3. (Optional) Strain each egg in a sieve and put them individually into its own small bowl.
  4. Make a big swirl in the water with a large spoon. Drop each egg from its bowl into the hot water along the outside and let them sit for 2:45.
  5. When the eggs are done cooking, use a holed spatula to lift them up from the boiling water. Clean up the poached eggs by removing any small strings or pieces of egg white and place them on paper towels. The egg surfaces needs to cool down and be lukewarm before serving, otherwise the sauce will split along the boundary surface. Use ice water and pat them dry with a paper towel to speed up this process if you like – or just wait for a few minutes while you make the rest of the plating.

Hollandaise Sauce

2 servings (20 minutes)

  • 2 egg yolks
  • 5 ml white wine vinegar
  • 100 g room-temperature butter
  1. Separate the egg yolks from the whites. Reserve the whites for other use and put the yolks in a bowl together with the vinegar.
  2. Whisk and warm the egg yolks and vinegar slowly over a bain-marie (a saucepan filled with simmering water) in a metal bowl until slightly foamy, the yolks should not get coagulated. Continuously lift up your bowl from the bain-marie to touch the bottom of the bowl to check the temperature, it should never be hot to touch, only warm.
  3. Take one third of the butter (in cubes) and whisk into the yolks, still checking the temperature continuously. Once incorporated, take the rest of the butter in two batches.
  4. To finish, season with salt and a little black pepper.

Smoked Chuck-eye and Hash Browns Eggs Benedict

Smoked chuck-eye and hash browns eggs Benedict

Classic Eggs Benedict

2 servings (25 minutes)

  • 4 poached eggs
  • 4 english muffins
  • 4 slices of ham (3mm thick)
  • Hollandaise sauce
  1. Toast the English muffins and sear the ham lightly in a pan.
  2. Assemble four Eggs Benedict: muffin followed by ham, egg and Hollandaise sauce.

Mashed Potato Eggs Benedict

2 servings (40 minutes)

  • 6 medium sized floury potatoes
  • 1 small onion
  • 1 clove garlic
  • Fresh chives

Potato cakes

  1. Peel the potatoes and boil in salted water until very soft (almost breaking apart), ca. 15 minutes. Heat an oven to 225 °C (440 °F).
  2. While the potatoes are boiling, finely chop the onion, garlic and some chives.
  3. When the potatoes are done, mash together with the onion, garlic and herbs. Season with salt and pepper.
  4. Prepare a baking tray with parchment paper. Use ring molds to form four 2.5 cm (1”) thick potato cakes. Bake at 225 °C (440 °F) for 10 minutes.
  • 4 poached eggs
  • 4 potato cakes
  • 100g pancetta or pork butt bacon
  • Hollandaise sauce

To finish

  1. Cut the pancetta into 5 cm (2”) lengths and place into a heated pan (medium-high heat). Stir the bacon in the hot pan for about 30 seconds and then lower the heat to medium and let the them slowly fry until the fat has rendered and they are crispy, around 4-5 minutes.
  2. Assemble the eggs on the potato cakes with bacon on top and some sauce on the plate.

Pulled Pork with Smoked Chili Hollandaise Sauce Eggs Benedict

2 servings (6 hours)

  • 10 g medium-coarse salt (kosher salt, for example)
  • 20 g coarse ground black pepper
  • Ancho powder
  • 1.2-1.8 kg pork butt or pork belly steak
  • 15 ml apple cider vinegar
  • 5 ml japanese soy
  • 5 ml liquid smoke
  • 5 ml 12-15 year aged rum
  • 5 ml simple syrup

Indoor smoked pulled pork

  1. Make a rub from ⅓ medium-coarse salt and ⅔ coarse ground black pepper. Add a pinch or dash of red chili powder (ancho, for example). Set aside in a bowl or airtight container (a big batch can be made and used when needed). Add a little curing salt (sodium nitrate) to the rub to create a smoke ring in the pork.
  2. Make the slather by mixing the apple cider vinegar, liquid smoke, soy, aged rum and simple syrup in a small bowl.
  3. Trim off any skin and big chunks of fat on the outside of the pork. Brush on the slather and then sprinkle on the rub evenly but quite generously, one side at a time. Pat on the rub before moving to the next side.
  4. Put the meat on a baking rack over a drip pan at 135 °C (275 °F) for 6 hours in a convection oven, using the fan, with what used to be the fat cap side up. Flip after 2 hours.
  5. After 3 hours (one hour after flipping) spray or dab on the rest of the slather and wrap in aluminum foil. When done, let the meat rest for 10-20 minutes before using forks or tongs to break it apart.
  • Hollandaise sauce
  • 5 ml liquid smoke
  • Red chili flakes

Smoked Chili Hollandaise

  1. Add liquid smoke and a pinch of red chili flakes to already prepared Hollandaise sauce and stir it gently in.
  • 4 poached eggs
  • Country-style sourdough wheat loaf
  • Pulled pork
  • Smoked chili hollandaise

To finish

  1. Cut 2.5 cm (1”) thick slices of the bread and use a circular cookie cutter or ring mold to make crustless disks.
  2. Fry the bread disks in butter at medium-high heat until they have taken on some color and developed a slight crust.
  3. Assemble the pulled pork on the bread disks, followed by sauce and the egg on top.

Smoked Chuck-eye and Hash Browns Eggs Benedict

2 servings (6 hours)

  • 20 g medium-coarse salt (kosher salt, for example)
  • 20 g coarse ground black pepper
  • Ca. 1.2-1.8 kg chuck-eye
  • 15 ml white wine vinegar
  • 5 ml japanese soy
  • 5 ml liquid smoke
  • 5 ml 12-15 year aged rum
  • 5 ml simple syrup

Indoor smoked chuck-eye

  1. Make a rub from equal parts medium-coarse salt and coarse ground black pepper. Set aside in a bowl or airtight container (a big batch can be made and used when needed). Add a little curing salt (sodium nitrate) to the rub to create a smoke ring.
  2. Make the slather by mixing the white wine vinegar, liquid smoke, japanese soy, aged rum and simple syrup in a small bowl.
  3. Trim off any skin and big chunks of fat on the outside of the pork. Brush on the slather and then sprinkle on the rub evenly but quite generously, one side at a time. Pat on the rub before moving to the next side.
  4. Put the meat on a baking rack over a drip pan at 135 °C (275 °F) for 6 hours in a convection oven, using the fan, with what used to be the fat cap side up. Flip after 2 hours.
  5. After 3 hours (one hour after flipping) spray or dab on the rest of the slather and wrap in aluminum foil. When done, let the meat rest for 10-20 minutes before cutting slices.
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 1 shallot onion
  • Thyme
  • 5 ml white wine vinegar
  • 100 g butter

Thyme and shallot Hollandaise Sauce

  1. Separate the egg yolks from the whites. Reserve the whites for other use and put the yolks in a bowl together with the vinegar.
  2. Finely dice the shallot. Melt the butter with the diced shallot in the same pan, add a little chopped fresh or dried thyme. Remove from the heat and rest until room-temperature, or at least warm but not hot as long as you’re careful in step 4.
  3. Whisk the egg yolks and vinegar until slightly foamy in a bowl that can stand solidly on its own.
  4. Slowly (really slowly at the start) drip the butter into the yolks while whisking. Continue adding more butter while whisking until it’s all incorporated. The hotter the butter, the more vigorously you need to whisk and the slower the drip of butter.
  5. To finish, season with salt and a little black pepper.
  • 250 g floury potatoes
  • 25 g potato flour
  • Butter

Hash brown cakes

  1. Peel and grate the potatoes into a bowl of water (or transfer quickly). Rinse from starch and squeeze out as much water as possible.
  2. Dust the grated potatoes with a little potato flour and stir around. Fill 7 cm (3”) ring molds with the potato mixture to make 0.5 cm (⅕”) thick cakes.
  3. Heat a frying pan to medium heat with a generous nob of butter. Place the potato cakes in the pan, flipping them every 30 seconds or so.
  4. Continue frying until golden and crisp with a soft inside.
  • 4 poached eggs
  • 4 hash brown potato cakes
  • Smoked chuck-eye
  • Thyme and shallot Hollandaise Sauce

To finish

  1. Slice the meat into 0.5 cm (⅕”) slices.
  2. Assemble the Smoked Chuck-eye and Hash Browns Eggs Benedict, starting with the potato cake followed by the smoked meat, the poached egg and finally the sauce.

Scones Benedict

2 servings (30 minutes)

  • 2.5 dl wheat flour
  • 5 ml baking soda
  • Pinch of salt
  • 50 g butter
  • 1 dl milk or yoghurt

Scones

  1. Mix the dry ingredients in a bowl. Heat an oven to 225 °C (440 °F).
  2. Cube the cold butter and incorporate it into the flour mix.
  3. Add half of the liquid and mix it in, it should become a sticky dough but not a batter. Add more if needed.
  4. Put a parchment paper on a baking tray. Divide the dough into four parts and make balls out of them. Place them on the paper and make sure that they are a little bit sticky so an irregular surface forms.
  5. Bake the scones for 20 minutes at 225 °C (440 °F). They should be gently darkened on the peaks of the surface when they’re done. When done, the scones can rest under a baking towel for a couple of hours until needed.
  • 4 poached eggs
  • 4 scones
  • 120g bacon
  • Hollandaise sauce

To finish

  1. Fry the bacon while the scones are in the oven. Start on medium-high heat and lower after about 30 seconds to medium (going from a 6 to a 4-5 on a 9 step stove). Keep in the pan until done and then them transfer to some paper towels. It usually takes around 4-5 minutes until they’re done.
  2. Split the scones and assemble the bacon on the scones, followed by the egg and sauce on top.